When the dissolution filing becomes effective, the business may not carry out any activities except those appropriate to wind up and liquidate its affairs. You also must file the appropriate dissolution forms with the Department of Revenue, Department of Workforce Development and the Attorney General in order to avoid tax consequences and additional liabilities.
Despite being a relatively new option, the limited liability company (LLC) is now one of the most popular business structures among smaller organizations. While allowing business owners to remain free from a great deal of the regulations imposed on other types of companies, it still provides limited liability protection for its owners (members). This means that the personal assets of an LLC's ownership cannot be collected to fulfill the debts of the business.

The first step in forming an LLC is to file your company’s Articles of Incorporation with the state in which you are looking to establish your business. Once this has been completed, it is recommended that you take the time to develop a formal set of documents that will explicitly outline the ownership and management structure of the business, as well as establish your initial bank accounts.


PLLC, Professional Limited Liability Company: some states do not allow certain professionals to form an LLC that would limit the liability that results from the services professionals provide such as doctors, medical care; lawyers, legal advice; and accountants, accounting services; architects, architectural services; when the company formed offers the services of the professionals. Instead those states allow a PLLC or in the LLC statutes, the liability limitation only applies to the business side, such as creditors of the company, as opposed to the client/customer service side, the level of medical care, legal services, or accounting provided to clients. This is meant to maintain the higher ethical standards that these professionals have committed themselves to by becoming licensed in their profession and to prevent them from being immune (or at least limit their immunity) to malpractice suits.
Guam "corporation", "incorporated", "company", or "limited", or the abbreviation "corp.", "inc.", "co.", or "ltd.", or words or abbreviations of like import in another language; if the word "company" or its abbreviation is used, it shall not be immediately preceded by the word "and" or an abbreviation or symbol representing the word "and." Title 18, § 2110, Guam Code Annotated
From LLC filing to finding a registered agent to drafting operating agreements, Incfile is here with you every step of the way as you form your business. We provide lifetime company alerts to make sure that you never miss an important due date and can assist with protecting your good standing by filing any mandatory reports with the state. Learn more about the company incorporation and filing services we offer, from LLC formation to nonprofit filing and more.
If you received a Notice to File a Business Property Statement from the Assessor and your business is no longer in operation, you are still required to file the Business Property Statement. You should also include a note on the Business Property Statement indicating that the business has closed, so the Assessor does not continue to assess the property.
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