An LLC that does not want to accept its default federal tax classification, or that wishes to change its classification, uses Form 8832, Entity Classification Election (PDF), to elect how it will be classified for federal tax purposes. Generally, an election specifying an LLC’s classification cannot take effect more than 75 days prior to the date the election is filed, nor can it take effect later than 12 months after the date the election is filed. An LLC may be eligible for late election relief in certain circumstances. See About Form 8832, Entity Classification Election for more information.
Data and images provided in searches are for informational purposes only. Any certification of authenticity of this information must be provided by the office of the Ohio Secretary of State. The names provided for Business Name searches are only names that have been accepted by the office of the Ohio Secretary of State. These will not include names that may be in process. Filings that are in process are accepted on a first come, first served basis. Request for a specific name is NOT guaranteed until you have received approval in writing from the office of the Ohio Secretary of State that your request has been approved.
The application required for incorporating as a Limited Liability Company (LLC) is called the Articles of Incorporation (also referred to as a Certificate of Incorporation). This document contains basic information about the company, its owners, and its directors. Depending on your state of incorporation, there may also be state-level fees or taxes that must be paid.
The businesses registered with the State of Utah are either located in Utah or doing business in Utah as a: Business Trust, Collection Agency, Corporation (For Profit and Non Profit), Professional Corporation, Doing Business As - DBA, Limited Liability Company - LLC, Limited Liability Partnership - LLP, Limited Partnerships - LP, Limited Cooperative Associations - LCA
Utah	"corporation", "incorporated", "company"; the abbreviation: "corp.", "inc." or "co." or words or abbreviations of like import to the words or abbreviations listed in another language; without the written consent of the United States Olympic Committee, may not contain the words "Olympic", "Olympiad", or "Citius Altius Fortius"; without the written consent of the Division of Consumer Protection may not contain the words "university", "college" or "institute"	§ 16-10a-401 Utah Code

Since limited liability companies can be a pass-through entity, owners are taxed on their personal income. S-Corp shareholders are taxed personally. The S-Corp, however, is not. C-Corp income is taxed at the corporate level first, then again at the personal level. This is called "double taxation." Non-Profits are only taxed once and can write off most of their expenses. Sole Proprietors are taxed only on their personal tax return.
Information on this Web site is collected, maintained, and provided for the convenience of the user. While the Secretary of State’s Office strives to keep such information accurate and updated, the Secretary of State’s Office does not certify the authenticity of information contained herein as it originates from third parties. The Secretary of State’s Office shall under no circumstances be liable for any actions taken or omissions made from reliance upon any information contained herein regardless of the source.
Tennessee "corporation", "incorporated", "company", or the abbreviation "corp.", "inc.", "co.", or words or abbreviations of like import in another language (provided they are written in Roman characters or letters); existing corporations which were formed using only "limited" or "ltd" are not required to change their name § 48-14-101 Tennessee Code
Limited liability companies are easy to maintain while remaining extremely flexible, so it's not surprising that it is a popular choice among businesses of all different shapes and sizes. Often, owners of an LLC are self employed or run smaller businesses, where the simplicity of pass through taxation and a lack of annual requirements makes a lot of sense. Since the profits and losses are reported directly on the owners personal tax returns, filing taxes is much easier.
LLCs are typically taxed on a pass through basis, much like general partnerships. As pass through entities, the profits and losses of LLCs are passed on to the individual owners and are reflected on the owner’s personal income tax returns. Alternatively, LLCS may elect to be taxed as S corporations to potentially reduce the self-employment taxes imposed on the owners.
All formal business entities, including LLCs, are required to have a Registered Agent on file with the state at all times. The agent may be an individual or company with a physical address located in the state of incorporation. Agents must be available at all times during standard business hours (9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday – Friday). The role of a Registered Agent is to receive any and all of communications from the government to the business. The agent’s name and address must be disclosed as part of the company’s public record.

As a "Third Party Designee, filing agent" pursuant to IRS Form SS-4, paid prepares and submits applications for an Employer Identification Number ("EIN") to the IRS as a representantive of our clients. Free-LLC.com does not verify EIN application submissions and is not responsible for the accuracy of the information provided. Any individual may obtain and submit his or her own EIN application at no cost through the official IRS website at www.irs.gov.


Every effort has been made to ensure that the information contained on this site is up to date and accurate. As the Department relies upon information provided to it, the information's completeness or accuracy cannot be guaranteed. If you have any questions about performing a search or the results you receive, please contact the NYS Department of State, Division of Corporations at (518) 473-2492, Monday - Friday, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. and 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

If you received a Notice to File a Business Property Statement from the Assessor and your business is no longer in operation, you are still required to file the Business Property Statement. You should also include a note on the Business Property Statement indicating that the business has closed, so the Assessor does not continue to assess the property.
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