For businesses in industries like construction or real estate, where unforeseen circumstances and hazardous conditions may hold the owner responsible, consider starting an LLC. The protection gained means you will not be held personally liable, protecting you and your family from litigation or the debts of the business. An LLC may not be the best choice for business owners who plan on raising capital through outside investment. LLCs are not public structures and do not have shareholders, so taking a company public is not an option either. However, in the event that you'd like to take your business public you may switch to a public legal structure, like a C corporation, later on.
It should also be noted that the state of New York requires limited liability companies to comply with an unusually strict set of publication requirements. In addition to publishing notices in two papers in the county in which your business is forming, you will also be required to provide proof of this to New York’s Department of State within 120 days of becoming officially recognized as a business. Failing to do so can result in suspension of your right to conduct business in the state.
All states require potential LLC owners to file a substantial set of documents, typically called the Articles of Organization, in order to establish their business. We can take care of this process for you, saving you time, effort, and allowing you to focus on developing your business – not filing paperwork. Lean on our expertise to ensure all paperwork is filed correctly the first time.
Where the equipment you use in your business was acquired as a gift, you may report your estimate of its current market value on the Business Property Statement (that is, what you think it would sell for in the open market place). Enter that estimated value in the most current year's cost line and add a note indicating that the entry is an estimate.
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